Angelfish

Angelfish can be distinguished from butterfly fish by their protractile mouth and the presence of a spine at the base of the operculum.

They are good swimmers and live alone or in small groups, close to shelters such as caves and coral overhangs. As angelfish are highly territorial, they react badly to other members of their own species. The coloring of the juveniles gradually changes when they reach 8-10 cm (though this is not a general rule), and turns into that of the adults.

Juveniles adapt more easily to captivity, but only one angelfish can be kept in a 500 liter tank.

Their diet should consist of brine shrimps, mussels, and shrimps, along with cooked and chopped vegetable material.

Chaetodonplusmesoleucus

The Singapore angelfish resembles a Chaetodon; the young a the adults. It is relatively acclimatize if it is first fed live prey; it will then go on to accf artificial food. Size: 17 c •

• Chaetodonplus melanosoma

The black velvet angelfish respects other species but chases members of its own species off its territory. It is shy, a good swimmer, and reckoned to be hardy. It devours large prey (nereis, also known as rag worms), but also eats tubifex worms and brine shrimps, as well as grazing on algae. Its skin is very sensitive to parasites. Size: 18 cm.

Chaetodonplusmesoleucus

The Singapore angelfish resembles a Chaetodon; the young a the adults. It is relatively acclimatize if it is first fed live prey; it will then go on to accf artificial food. Size: 17 c •

• Chaetodonplus melanosoma

The black velvet angelfish respects other species but chases members of its own species off its territory. It is shy, a good swimmer, and reckoned to be hardy. It devours large prey (nereis, also known as rag worms), but also eats tubifex worms and brine shrimps, as well as grazing on algae. Its skin is very sensitive to parasites. Size: 18 cm.

Euxiphipops xanthometopon

Young blueface angelfish acclimatize more easily and can adopt a "cleaning" role with other fish. The adults, territorial and fearful, prefer small items of food, with some vegetable material.

Euxiphipops xanthometopon

Young blueface angelfish acclimatize more easily and can adopt a "cleaning" role with other fish. The adults, territorial and fearful, prefer small items of food, with some vegetable material.

Holacanthustricolor

The black patch on the juveniles of the rock beauty angelfish enlarges as they grow, until, by the time they are adults, it covers their entire body. Famous for being difficult to acclimatize, they feed on algae, brine shrimps, and small pieces of fish. Size: 15 cm. •

Holacanthusciliaris

Even the juvenile queen angelfish are territorial, which can cause cohabitation problems. They are easy to acclimatize, but demanding as regards the quality of the water. Their diet comprises brine shrimp, sponges, algae, and mussels. Size: 20 cm.

Pomacanthusannularis

Adult annularis angelfish can grow to 30 cm. Their acclimatization is more difficult that of younger fish, below 7 or 8 cm, which adapt to captivity better. These fish graze on the algae in the decor but also appreciate meat dishes: reddish food seems to attract them, so it is worth trying to make them a "pate" in this color.

Pomacanthus chrysurus

The African angelfish is rarely seen in aquariums. It needs vegetable components in its diet. When it is young, its yellow-orange tail distinguishes it from the queen angelfish. Size: 20 cm.

ANGELFISH JUVENILES' COLORING:

HOW TO AVOID BEING TAKEN FOR AN INTRUDER

The coloring of angelfish juveniles (usually consisting of lines) is markedly different from that of adults. This enables them to avoid being considered as intruders on their own patch, as the adults rebuff fish of the same species, or those with similar coloring, in order to defend their territory and its resources: food and shelters. Both juveniles and adults share the same goal: to survive and perpetuate the species.

Queen angelfish

Juvenile.

• Euxiphipops navarchus

Somewhat shy, the majestic angelfish likes to have hiding places. This does not prevent it from being an assiduous grazer of the decor's algae, although it does also accept small prey. Size: 20 cm.

Queen angelfish

Juvenile.

Queen angelfish

Queen angelfish

Pomacanthusimperator

This is one of the most beautiful of all the angelfish. However, the territoriality of the emperor angelfish can make it aggressive towards other occupants of the tank. The juveniles display several white circles against a blue background. This fish eats raw or cooked mussels, nereis, tubifex worms, fish flesh, shrimps, lettuce, and plenty of filamentous algae. Size: 20 cm.

Pomacanthus paru

Sub-adult.

Pomacanthus paru

Pomacanthus maculosus

In its natural environment, the purple s on sponges and coral, so these should be avoided in its aquarium. In captivity it can small, live prey, and can then move on to commercial food. Size: 30 cm.

Pomacanthus paru

Sub-adult.

Pomacanthus paru

Pomacanthusparu

Active by day and night, the French angelfish will eat brine shrimps and mussels, and can sometimes be tamed. The adult resembles that of the Pomacanthus arcuatus (gray angelfish), but the ends of its scales glow with luminous yellow dots. The young of both species can similarly be confuse markedly different from curved yellow stripes ac background. Size: 25 c

• Pomacanthus semicirculatus

The young have a dark blue body set off by fine white lines curving towards the rear. The territorial raccoon angelfish leaves its shelter to eat nereis, raw or scalded mussels, shrimps, pieces of fish, and tubifex worms, as well as algae, lettuce, and riccia.

Genicanthus caudovittatus

The Japanese swallow can be distinguished from the G. lamarck by its vertical stripes. Shy, but often on the move, it eats the same as the G. lamarck: prey small enough to fit into its mouth. Size: 20 cm.

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  • arabella
    How to tame singapore angelfish?
    8 years ago
  • Iole
    How to get a black velvet angelfish to eat?
    7 years ago

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